Am I protected or not?


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Found this in my log:

>>

Apr 5 10:29:15 Tower apcupsd[31270]: UPS Self Test switch to battery.
Apr 5 10:29:23 Tower apcupsd[31270]: UPS Self Test completed: Not supported

<<

Not sure if I am protected or not.

 

Any comments?

 

Thank you.

 

 

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You are most likely still protected, however the "Back-UPS" units are usually more intended for small, lower power devices like your router or cordless phone.

While they can be connected to computers, the information they output over USB to the host is usually only "core" information about line conditions, battery voltage and estimated runtime.

 

I believe the error you're getting means that either the ACPUPS service, or the UPS itself attempted to perform a self test (I believe APC UPS's perform self tests every 2 weeks), but that your UPS doesnt support reporting on it.

It may be possible to perform one manually, however I would recommend stopping any Containers or VM's if you have them running and then stop the array (just in case) first, then try holding down the power button on the UPS for around 3 seconds. The power button should begin to flash and then go back to solid once the test is done.

 

You can also try just unplugging the UPS from the wall and see if it holds.

If it does, i'd recommend leaving it unplugged and letting it drain to around 30%. This should help re-calibrate the UPS's estimated runtime.

It's also a good way to test if notifications (assuming you've configured a notification agent under `Settings => Notifications`) are working properly

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Thank you for the reply.

 

Here is a case when the power 'blinked':

 

Feb 25 01:15:16 Tower apcupsd[2162]: Power failure.

Feb 25 01:15:18 Tower apcupsd[2162]: Power is back. UPS running on mains.

 

Think I am going to simulate the power failure  (with array stopped) and see if running on batteries.

 

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Keep in mind that when you unplug it from the wall, any devices connected to it are no longer grounded unless you've attached a ground lead to the lug on the back of the UPS. Safer option (for you and the device) is to flip the breaker sending power to the outlet

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13 hours ago, JamiePhonic said:

You can also try just unplugging the UPS from the wall and see if it holds.

If it does, i'd recommend leaving it unplugged and letting it drain to around 30%. This should help re-calibrate the UPS's estimated runtime.

It's also a good way to test if notifications (assuming you've configured a notification agent under `Settings => Notifications`) are working properly

It is far better from the UPS and hardware safety point of view to avoid just disconnecting by unplugging.  This creates risk of some very nasty current spikes, especially on reconnection (been there, done that.).  Instead, I would recommend running the calibration process that is built into the embedded software in most APC UPS units.  This post shows how...

 

Edited by S80_UK
typos (again)
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I'll join the pile with a little technical reason why yanking the plug is bad.

 

If you don't keep your equipment all referenced to the same ground with a large enough wire, any current imbalance generated will travel across wires you never anticipated, like ethernet cables. You can very easily damage network ports on your PC or router or switch, or any USB connected equipment not on the same UPS. If your monitor is plugged in to a different outlet, you can fry it or the video card.

 

Either trip the breaker, or temporarily wire in a power strip with a switch so you can cut power to the UPS without interrupting the ground leg.

 

Many UPS companies explicitly state that you are never to test the UPS by pulling the plug.

 

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Another observation after looking at your settings.  If you are in a part of the world where the electrical supply are reliable then you need to rethink how you want to set up your UPS. 

 

What I am referring to is that in these areas, there are two types of power interruptions.  the first type is caused by the protection circuits controlled by the Power supplier.  These will normally last less than ten seconds.  The second type is the uncontrolled type (caused by things like wind storms, lightening hits, drunks driving into power poles, etc.) and they can last for anywhere from thirty minutes to days.  (Back in a ice storm in 2004, we were out for TEN days!!!!)

 

The consumer type UPS can only protect against the first type.  Recognizing that is often a big step for most people.  Once you do, a case can be made for shutting down the system after the power has been out for anywhere from thirty seconds to three minutes on battery power. 

 

Why would you want to do this?  Because if you run the server on battery until only 3 minutes of battery charge is left, it will take between eight and twenty-four hours to fully recharge that battery after power returns.  IF you only wait ten minutes after power returns before you restart your server if a second power outrage were to occur, you may not have enough battery reserves to shut the server down. 

 

Another factor is that is very hard on lead-acid batteries to do a deep discharge unless they are designed for it.  Another factor is that these batteries do lose capacity as they age.  So your indicated three minutes of battery charge may on be thirty seconds resulting in an unclean shutdown. 

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YES!!!!

 

You want to always leave the maximum amount of battery you can on your UPS. Draining a UPS can shorten its life, but if you have 25minutess in reserve and decide to wait until you have a few minutes left, what happens if your machine hangs on shutdown and doesn't make it entirely and dumps. 

 

I think I have 25minutes in reserve too. I probably should look at how much time I have with all drives spinning. Lol

I have mine set if I loose power for 5minutes begin shut down. 

 

I have another UPS with a 3D Printer connected to it and I have it set that if i loose power keep on printing. Its saved 2 prints so far because of a temp power outage. Sure I might loose my UPS on that machine eventually, but its easier to buy a new UPS than try to salvage a 60hour Print. 😂

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