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$90 Xeon E5-2670 2.6Ghz (8cores / 16threads)

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Posted (edited)
On 3/12/2018 at 12:54 PM, NotYetRated said:

Anyone here using a ASrock EP2C602? I am having some difficulty getting full speed out of my SSD's on any of the 14 ports. They are topping out at around 225MB/s. If I throw them on my LSI 9220-8i, I get the full ~550MB/s, however lose TRIM support.

I assume you're using the ASRock - EP2C602-4L/D16, if so I own two systems utilizing this board.

Of the 14 SATA ports onboard, only 2 are full SATA III, (at least in unRAID, as the Marvell controlled ports have an issue in unRAID, I can't remember specifically what it was).

 

I run 3 LSI 9211-8i's in IT mode, so all but my 2 cache SSD's are on the controllers.

Edited by Drider
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10 hours ago, Drider said:

as the Marvell controlled ports have an issue in unRAID, I can't remember specifically what it was).

For me it was dropping drives every couple of hours to couple of months without an apparent reason that I could determine.  And that was when they were passed to a Windows VM and not part of the unRAID array.  I would never even consider using drives in the array on the Marvel controller.  I'm testing fate again with another marvel controller but this time it is drives running under unRAID but NOT part of the array.  Needed 4+ ports on PCI not PCIe slot and my Silicon Image 3124 card was not recognized so had to use my SAT2-MV8 based Marvel controller.  May have to research other cards if it starts dropping drives.  Just tried cards I had on hand.

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Posted (edited)

Between my two servers I have 6 HBA controllers:

In each system I have one Intel RS2WC80 and two Dell PERC H310's.  All are LSI 9211-8i controllers Flashed to IT mode, and working great at full 6GB Transfer speeds.

The Dells are a little more of a pain to flash to IT, but still relatively straight forward. (It's dealing with UEFI BiOS that takes the most time.)

 

The H310's can be picked up on eBay fairly cheap now ~$50.00 or less..

 

EDIT:  Just re-read your post, and realized you looking for PCI.  Yeah ... do they even list those as antiques anymore?

Edited by Drider

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16 hours ago, Drider said:

Between my two servers I have 6 HBA controllers:

In each system I have one Intel RS2WC80 and two Dell PERC H310's.  All are LSI 9211-8i controllers Flashed to IT mode, and working great at full 6GB Transfer speeds.

The Dells are a little more of a pain to flash to IT, but still relatively straight forward. (It's dealing with UEFI BiOS that takes the most time.)

 

The H310's can be picked up on eBay fairly cheap now ~$50.00 or less..

 

EDIT:  Just re-read your post, and realized you looking for PCI.  Yeah ... do they even list those as antiques anymore?

Do those support TRIM for SSD's? I've got 3 SSD's in the system currently...

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4 hours ago, NotYetRated said:

Do those support TRIM for SSD's? I've got 3 SSD's in the system currently...

Hmm..  I'm not sure.

I'm finalizing setup of my newer machine now, so I can test it out.

I planed to run Microsoft Hyper-V Core, with unRAID as a VM inside, so I' not sure if that will effect the results or not...

 

I should know more this weekend.

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On 4/13/2018 at 5:37 AM, Drider said:

Hmm..  I'm not sure.

I'm finalizing setup of my newer machine now, so I can test it out.

I planed to run Microsoft Hyper-V Core, with unRAID as a VM inside, so I' not sure if that will effect the results or not...

 

I should know more this weekend.

It think you'll find its pretty hard to pass the USB through to the VM.

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10 hours ago, pengrus said:

So can any of you savvy individuals comment on this deal?  https://natex.us/4uS7050/

 

Seems too good to be true...

 

Thanks!

 

-P

natex is real and they do have good deals, which often run out.

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11 hours ago, pengrus said:

So can any of you savvy individuals comment on this deal?  https://natex.us/4uS7050/

 

Seems too good to be true...

 

Thanks!

 

-P

I like Tyan MBs (have several Tyan S5512 boards) up until I started using Dual processor ASRock MB most of my MBs were Tyan.  Never used a Tyan case before so can't say about that.  

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On 5/9/2018 at 7:22 PM, pengrus said:

So can any of you savvy individuals comment on this deal?  https://natex.us/4uS7050/

 

Seems too good to be true...

 

 

Data point: I picked up a used bare Supermicro X9DRI-LN4F+ plus two E5-2680v2's for $541 total shipped (including CA 9.25% tax on the CPUs) with the last eBay 15% coupon on May 4.  So without knowing if the Natex package includes drive cages and power supply, I think it's reasonable but not TGBT.

 

 

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Is it not crippling to get a MB that most SATAs are only 3gbps?

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On 5/10/2018 at 7:06 AM, BobPhoenix said:

I like Tyan MBs (have several Tyan S5512 boards) up until I started using Dual processor ASRock MB most of my MBs were Tyan.  Never used a Tyan case before so can't say about that.  

Thank you, that's exactly what I was wondering.  Hadn't really heard of them before but the spec sheet is excellent!

 

 

5 minutes ago, Gico said:

Is it not crippling to get a MB that most SATAs are only 3gbps?

Well, I feel like the bottleneck isn't the SATA pipe, 3gbps is still 375MBx0.8 overhead is still 300MB/s which will saturate gigabit ethernet and the parity calculation.  Plus, others have just used an LSI at 6gbps in the x8 or x16 lanes and ignored the SATAIIs on the MB altogether.  For my purposes (server upgrade!  dual xeons FTW!) I think it's probably fine.  Smarter people than I should chime in though.

 

On 5/13/2018 at 7:33 AM, Nyago123 said:

Data point: I picked up a used bare Supermicro X9DRI-LN4F+ plus two E5-2680v2's for $541 total shipped (including CA 9.25% tax on the CPUs) with the last eBay 15% coupon on May 4.  So without knowing if the Natex package includes drive cages and power supply, I think it's reasonable but not TGBT.

Awesome, thanks.  Wish the website was a  little more descriptive, but hey.  It doesn't come with cages, that's an extra $225 from them.  I was going to go rackmount for the upgrade, but it's just too expensive having not started out that way.  Considering now going with just a massive tower up on a bench or something so my kids can't go all ooh blinky lights and suddenly the server's down.

 

Thanks!

 

-p

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3 hours ago, Gico said:

Is it not crippling to get a MB that most SATAs are only 3gbps?

 

It is crippling - if the goal is to build a high-performance machine all around SSD.

 

It's not so easy for a HDD to reach 300 MB/s. Especially not to get a HDD that can do 300 MB/s over the full surface and not just the outside tracks.

 

It isn't always good to try to buy IT equipment based on expected needs 5 years forward in time.

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On 5/10/2018 at 12:04 AM, squark said:

It think you'll find its pretty hard to pass the USB through to the VM.

I'm not exactly sure what prompted your comment, but it was never my intent to pass USB through to any VM's.  This is a headless system, for business use running 14 Windows 8.1 Enterprise VM for my business, and employees, with an unRAID VM used as the local Storage/shares.

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4 hours ago, Drider said:

I'm not exactly sure what prompted your comment, but it was never my intent to pass USB through to any VM's.  This is a headless system, for business use running 14 Windows 8.1 Enterprise VM for my business, and employees, with an unRAID VM used as the local Storage/shares.

Interesting use.  Why 8.1 instead of Win10?  All accessed via RDP?  What are you using for RDP clients?  How much memory for each VM?

 

And finally, what problems did you have to resolve to make this stable enough for your business.

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17 hours ago, tr0910 said:

Interesting use.  Why 8.1 instead of Win10?  All accessed via RDP?  What are you using for RDP clients?  How much memory for each VM?

 

And finally, what problems did you have to resolve to make this stable enough for your business.

I'm not a fan of Windows 10 in the business environment, at least not yet.

I see proof everyday Windows 10 is still in infancy, uncontrollable updates wreak havoc in a business environment, and still a lot of compatibility issues with different software.

 

All are accessed via RDP, with a mixture of windows based PC's, nComputing N300 thin clients, and Dell Wyse Terminals.

 

The RAM depends on the designated use of the system, and with Enterprise edition of windows 8.1 it's dynamic based on the load of each individual VM.

So for example, I have 5 VM's that startup with 512MB of RAM, but have the ability to request up to 12GB based on load demands.  In reciprocation, when the demand lowers it releases the memory back to the system.

 

I've been working with Hyper-V for going on 5 years now, so I'm pretty familiar with it.

The only unknown really was getting unRAID setup in a VM, but really it wasn't a problem.

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Drider said:

I'm not a fan of Windows 10 in the business environment, at least not yet.

I see proof everyday Windows 10 is still in infancy, uncontrollable updates wreak havoc in a business environment, and still a lot of compatibility issues with different software.

 

All are accessed via RDP, with a mixture of windows based PC's, nComputing N300 thin clients, and Dell Wyse Terminals.

 

The RAM depends on the designated use of the system, and with Enterprise edition of windows 8.1 it's dynamic based on the load of each individual VM.

So for example, I have 5 VM's that startup with 512MB of RAM, but have the ability to request up to 12GB based on load demands.  In reciprocation, when the demand lowers it releases the memory back to the system.

 

I've been working with Hyper-V for going on 5 years now, so I'm pretty familiar with it.

The only unknown really was getting unRAID setup in a VM, but really it wasn't a problem.

So unRaid is not the bare metal hypervisor?  unRaid is a vm itself inside Hyper-V?  Would you consider using unRaid as the bare metal hypervisor?

 

Win 8 was a virus that never got loaded on my machines (LOL).  I transitioned from Win7 which I loved to Win10.  I don't have any horror stories so far, but I have several dual 2670 rigs, on Intel 2600cp2 mb, and one of them is getting more duty as a bare metal hypervisor of Win10 RDP clients under unRaid.  So far so good, but I only have less than 6 so far.  With 128gb RAM, there is really no limit for me to continue this process.  I have never let Win10 start with low RAM and then allow it to grow exponentially like you are.  I usually just set them up with 8gb and forget about it.  Maybe I should play around with your dynamic memory model???

 

My main complaint with unRaid as a bare metal hypervisor is requiring VM's to be shut down before you can stop the array.  That is a pain and requires scheduling to make sure it doesn't affect other people...

Edited by tr0910

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, tr0910 said:

So unRaid is not the bare metal hypervisor?  unRaid is a vm itself inside Hyper-V?  Would you consider using unRaid as the bare metal hypervisor?

 

Nope, and to be clear I run Windows Hyper-V core 2016.  I prefer the light weight nature for the Hyper-V system, and having the disk, and resources distributed through Hyper-V.  It's really a preference, and I couldn't tell you if there's really any discernible difference in Hyper-V vs unRAID VM management, at least nothing in my use case.  I will say if I were to build a box that was to be used as a hub for gaming, much like LTT's examples, THEN I would be running unRAID VM Manager for sure.  Again, my use is purely business, so the need is just not there.

1 hour ago, tr0910 said:

Win 8 was a virus that never got loaded on my machines (LOL).  I transitioned from Win7 which I loved to Win10.  I don't have any horror stories so far, but I have several dual 2670 rigs, on Intel 2600cp2 mb, and one of them is getting more duty as a bare metal hypervisor of Win10 RDP clients under unRaid.  So far so good, but I only have less than 6 so far.  With 128gb RAM, there is really no limit for me to continue this process.  I have never let Win10 start with low RAM and then allow it to grow exponentially like you are.  I usually just set them up with 8gb and forget about it.  Maybe I should play around with your dynamic memory model???

 

Windows 8.1, (not 8), was a highly underrated OS.  It mainly got a bad wrap because of the Metro theme and start button. Well simple Classic Shell, and magically it works just like windows 7.  I prefer 8.1 over 7, especially the enterprise versions as the patches and advancements are quite apparent in daily use.  8.1 really was a lightweight and efficient OS.  My total installation package with current updates sits around 27GB after a disk clean when updates are completed.  Not to mention the far more stable daily use over Windows 10 right now.  If you plan to run quite a few VM's in one system, and you can get your hand on Enterprise versions of windows, it's definitely the path you want to go.  Not only is the memory assigned dynamically, but the HDD space can be as well.  SO if your VM starts to run out of disk space in a year, you can expand it right there in the Hyper-V manager.

1 hour ago, tr0910 said:

My main complaint with unRaid as a bare metal hypervisor is requiring VM's to be shut down before you can stop the array.  That is a pain and requires scheduling to make sure it doesn't affect other people...

Well, you pretty much can't escape this in any VM host.  I mean you CAN shut down the Hyper-V and just terminate all VM's in that instant, but it's not recommended as it's pretty much the same as pulling the plug on a system.  At least unRAID has a built in safety forcing you to perform a shut down of the VM's before it destroys them.  In most other VM managers, you get an "are you sure?" warning, but that's it.

Edited by Drider

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Drider said:

Windows 8.1, (not 8), was a highly underrated OS.  It mainly got a bad wrap because of the Metro theme and start button. Well simple Classic Shell, and magically it works just like windows 7.  I prefer 8.1 over 7, especially the enterprise versions as the patches and advancements are quite apparent in daily use.  8.1 really was a lightweight and efficient OS.  My total installation package with current updates sits around 27GB after a disk clean when updates are completed.  Not to mention the far more stable daily use over Windows 10 right now.  If you plan to run quite a few VM's in one system, and you can get your hand on Enterprise versions of windows, it's definitely the path you want to go.  Not only is the memory assigned dynamically, but the HDD space can be as well.  SO if your VM starts to run out of disk space in a year, you can expand it right there in the Hyper-V manager.

 

My use is purely business too.  I have Win10 N (stripped of the media junk) running in 12gb of disk space, but it definitely grows with updates.  A major update needs another 10gb minimum during the updating process so I usually go with 30gb for lightweight VM's but I have some that run in 20gb.  Being able to easily grow the VM disk space would be nice. 

 

Edited by tr0910

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Posted (edited)
On 5/18/2018 at 4:36 AM, tr0910 said:

 

My use is purely business too.  I have Win10 N (stripped of the media junk) running in 12gb of disk space, but it definitely grows with updates.  A major update needs another 10gb minimum during the updating process so I usually go with 30gb for lightweight VM's but I have some that run in 20gb.  Being able to easily grow the VM disk space would be nice. 

 

I take back my previous statement, I was padding my estimate.

With 8.1 Enterprise, after all current updates, and a disk clean up, the VM's run at 23GB total disk size.

 

This is with Office 2013 Professional Plus, and a few other applications including all of their updates.

Edited by Drider

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