Seagate ST3000DM001 Class Action Lawsuit


bsim

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Anyone heard of the Seagate ST3000DM001 class action lawsuit? A group of lawyers are suing Seagate for the crappy drives (80% failure rate over 3 years) that were made in 2012-2014 (3TB drives)? Reason why Seagate drives went from 3 year to 1 year warranty.

I found the reason why I've lost 4 drives of a 24 drive array in less than 6 months. Thank unraid for dual parity support otherwise I would have really been p***ed off!

Drive statistics were pulled off of the Backblaze servers study.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ST3000DM001

 

https://www.hbsslaw.com/general-pages/seagate-hard-drives

Edited by bsim
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9 minutes ago, bsim said:

Reason why Seagate drives went from 3 year to 1 year warranty.

So, if Seagate made such terrible drives during that period (personally I disagree, and Backblaze stats need to be taken with a grain of salt), why did WD also drop its warranties during the same period?

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With the money I save on buying Seagates, I can afford to have a free one one every 4th drive. Raid for high end consumers requiring lower availability and high reliability is aiming for lowest priced drives (just as raid has classically aimed for). Just a bad run of drives, overall all drives are getting more reliable for less money...just sucks how much of a friggin monopoly  the drive market is becoming ever since the flood. I remember really nice hitochi drives for 70$ before that!

 

They dropped their warranties because they realized that their product model was a dog with a bad case of fleas. I've researched that the ST3000DM001 was the only drive without a rotational vibration sensor that counteracts excessive vibration in heavy-usage cases.

 

Simple articles...

https://www.extremetech.com/extreme/175089-who-makes-the-most-reliable-hard-drives

http://www.zdnet.com/article/ssd-reliability-in-the-real-world-googles-experience/

blog-lifetime-by-drive-size.jpg

Edited by bsim
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Just had one start failing.   The issue with these drives is death is usually sudden and catastrophic. 

Parity check good Aug 27th. Array Heathy good at 6:3am I start getting pending sector warnings. 
What is odd is the numbers keep going up and I wasn't even using the array. 
as I am trying to rsync the data over to another drive, the numbers just keep climbing. 

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7 hours ago, Squid said:

So, if Seagate made such terrible drives during that period (personally I disagree, and Backblaze stats need to be taken with a grain of salt), why did WD also drop its warranties during the same period?

 

The time frame was the flooding (which shut down production) which caused HDD prices to skyrocket, and HDD Mfgr's reduced warranties at the time as well (presumably to cut costs)

There is a specific model of the Seagate enterprise 3TB drives which suffer from the same problems, we have had near 100% failure rate in about a year of use.

I do agree to take the backblaze study with a grain of salt however there was a major problem with Seagate 3TB disks.

Edited by SG872
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5 hours ago, bsim said:

Simple articles...

 

 

5 hours ago, bsim said:

Uses Backblaze studies as the basis

 

According to consumer reports, the most reliable compact car is a Toyota Prius.  Using something akin to Backblaze for cars would say that it is the least reliable because you can't off-road in it.  I suppose the analogy is true.  Backblaze offroad's their hard drives and every one is surprised that a drive that's not designed to be used in that environment fails (not that they justify in their studies what a failure actually is.  Any statistic that says "such and such failed" without justifying what a failure is is by definition meaningless and unreliable.  Was the failure something that made it unreliable?  Was it something that slowed it down under their offroading of the drive?  Did it actually drop dead?  Or was it an attribute that increased that they didn't particularly like (After all, Seagate and WD both report their attributes differently, and Seagate is at least honest in their reporting of RAW values) )

 

Your mileage may vary of course.  Myself, yes the 7200.11 drives were a disaster (due to them being a precursor to the NAS drives and the firmware wasn't ready), but I would never buy a WD drive as I've had nothing but trouble.  I currently have 24x 3 & 4 TB Seagates in operation, and have never had to replace one over 4 years.  The rare times I've purchased a WD drive over the years they've never made it out of warranty, and are all no repurposed into computers other than my servers where I don't care so much about them.

 

5 hours ago, bsim said:

They dropped their warranties because they realized that their product model was a dog with a bad case of fleas

And I suppose that you'll argue that WD dropped their warranties at the same time because their products never fail?

 

 

 

And yes @kizer, I realize that I have the minority opinion here, but it doesn't matter.  After all, I'm right and you're wrong  :D  (Oh, and by the way, I'm an opinionated person)

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People,

please stop treating BackBlaze reports as church. They're horribly skewed and prone to innacuracy due to the bulk purchase of drives and the environmentals they're run in. 

Every manufacturer has a bad batch from time to time. It happens. 

Yes Seagate have had some horrible ones, the .11, the 1.5TB model, and the ST3000 of MY11/12. 

Everyone remembers the DeathStars, the Maxtors and others. 

 

We see the same with SSDs today, early SandForce controllers would just grenade without warning. 

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Folks, we've seemed to get off topic here...I agree every hard drive manufacturer sh*ts the bed every now and again, but hard drives are getting more reliable, for cheaper.  I like backblaze (and many many companies subscribing to the core RAID premise... "Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks") purchase drives by cost and not reliability (Seagate makes the cheapest/TB drives) which guarantees that I will have to replace drives, but the system they are part of will survive. Assuming failure rates at a random and consistent interval, buying "NAS" drives makes no sense (as their costs/TB are nuts). My stats on this model happen to be almost perfectly in line with backblaze, and I don't hammer drives all day long.  From what I've read, the problem was that the model didn't have a vibration mitigation system that is normally part of a modern drive...meaning just powering on the drive in a array causes degradation.

 

I started the topic to find out if anyone has heard anything about the status of the class action lawsuit because of the bad drive model. The reason I ask, is I've had 4 of the bad models (of 24 total drives) die instantly on me in the last 3 months. Thank you unraid for dual parity! The drives do run 24/7, are housed in a solid, protected and well ventilated system (drives don't hit 30 degC).

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