Build Report: Jonsbo N3 + CWWK J6413 SoC


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Starting from this German thread, I tried to plan a simple DIY NAS with "potential for more", built around a new SoC based on this German build report. The goal was to substitute my Synology DS 216j (1x WD Red 8 TB internal + USB-Dock-Backup on a WD green 4 TB for the critical data), with a more powerful, less proprietary, updateable and more reasonably priced DIY NAS, with potential use of docker, and maybe a VM.

This should give me sufficient basic power with enough options to upgrade when needed.

 

I wish I could report more progress at this point, but it turned out that the PSU does not fit the N3 - Which I lacked the experience to notice... The Jonsbo N series is appearently specified for PSX formfactor PSUs, where the Corsair is an ATX formfactor... The N3 is especially tight (<105, instead of <140 for the N2). I plan to use 2...4 HDDs only, so I initially intended to go for a picoPSU 160 W with external Leicke PSU. But the Corsair seemed to be more appropriate a case with up to 8x 3.5" HDDs + 2x 2.5" SSD, and I did not want to buy a new PSU later, so when the rare Corsair became available in a UK version, I just pulled the trigger.

 

Not sure what to do about it now. I could sell the Corsair and restrict myself to the picoPSU (as long as I do not need more than 4 HDDs), or find a similar efficient PSX unit right from the start.

 

BTW, the N3 has a really strange PSU concept: The PSU is seated internally in a bracket, with ~ 2 cm clearance to the case wall - with no access to the power cable socket and the main switch at all. Instead, the case comes with an internal cable (that goes where the bracket has 2 cm clearance, see fotos from N3 interior) with a plug for the PSU that is connected to a power socket on the back of the case... So appearently, you cannot hard-switch-off the system, but that is probably not so much relevant for a server that is rarely disconnected, and if so, requires a controlled power-down.

Material (small).jpg

N3 interior (from back) (small).jpg

N3 interior (from side) (small).jpg

N3 PSU clearance to front connector PCB (small).jpg

N3 PSU clearence to MoBo (small).jpg

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8 hours ago, headlong-wallflower2576 said:

Hiya,

 

This is SFX power supply :)

 

Good luck with your build !

 

 

Thanks!

 

Also for the SFX heads up: Looking at SFX specs, the height and width should fit (although it does not really look like it, and the screw holes do not match...). A length of 140 mm seems to be SFX standard - The Jonsbo's 105 is quite a bit on the lower end (especially for an 8 bay case), where the Corsair with 160 mm is a bit on the higher end... I will have a look if I can remove the USB/Audio jack PCB to make room for it - That seems to be the limitation - and fit it in there...

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On 9/14/2023 at 12:49 AM, headlong-wallflower2576 said:

This is SFX power supply :)

Ok, maybe I got it wrong as a rookie, but this is what I researched:

The Corsair RM550x is advertized as ATX and measures 150 mm (W) x 86 mm (H) x 160 mm (L), which, according to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_supply_unit_(computer)#Appearance seems to be more of an ATX large (up to 180 mm length, opposed to ATX spec 140 mm).

 

I measured a clearance for the PSU of ~140 mm x ~70 mm x 105 mm in the case - which leaves room for a SFX form factor PSU spec'ed as 125 mm x 63,5 mm x 100 mm. Even if I remove the mini-PCB which carries the Front USB, USB-C, and Audio sockets and limits length, that would only extend the length clearence, but not the rest.

 

The Corsair SF600 is advertized as SFX and measures 100 mm x 63 mm x 125 mm - So that would fit the bill, but at much larger ~170 € cost, and it's on backorder for basically the rest of the year (Dec 24...26)... So that is no solution at hand, either.

 

Are there any experiences with be Quiet or Sharkoon (or other) 500 W Gold rated SFX units, especially with efficiency in the most relevant idle @ 30 W range? Or would a picoPSU be the best way to go? I mainly bought the N3 for improved airflow around the hotswap backplate, not for actually equipping it with 8+2 drives. It just feels odd to limit options at this point, but I probably will not really need them...

Edited by madmin
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On 9/16/2023 at 12:33 AM, madmin said:

Ok, maybe I got it wrong as a rookie, but this is what I researched:

The Corsair RM550x is advertized as ATX and measures 150 mm (W) x 86 mm (H) x 160 mm (L), which, according to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_supply_unit_(computer)#Appearance seems to be more of an ATX large (up to 180 mm length, opposed to ATX spec 140 mm).

 

I measured a clearance for the PSU of ~140 mm x ~70 mm x 105 mm in the case - which leaves room for a SFX form factor PSU spec'ed as 125 mm x 63,5 mm x 100 mm. Even if I remove the mini-PCB which carries the Front USB, USB-C, and Audio sockets and limits length, that would only extend the length clearence, but not the rest.

 

The Corsair SF600 is advertized as SFX and measures 100 mm x 63 mm x 125 mm - So that would fit the bill, but at much larger ~170 € cost, and it's on backorder for basically the rest of the year (Dec 24...26)... So that is no solution at hand, either.

 

Are there any experiences with be Quiet or Sharkoon (or other) 500 W Gold rated SFX units, especially with efficiency in the most relevant idle @ 30 W range? Or would a picoPSU be the best way to go? I mainly bought the N3 for improved airflow around the hotswap backplate, not for actually equipping it with 8+2 drives. It just feels odd to limit options at this point, but I probably will not really need them...

I have ordered the same case and found the Corsair SF750 on amazon cheaper (and in stock) than the SF600 which was my first choice. 

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  • 1 month later...

There are two options to get more space out of it that have sufficient power too 

 

1 or 2. Inter-Tech PicoPSU 200W as a budget option (cables can be unplugged)

 

or 

 

HDPlex GAN 250W which can be daisy chained or 500W variant

 

the later ones are apparently much more expensive (but also of much higher quality)

 

Both options will likely provide more efficient power then any SFX Power Supply available right now

 

You will likely get 20-25W max with the most expensive SFX PSUs (30W with Gold) while either of the above almost make single digit wattages possible (10W)

 

Just wanted to drop that info here because SFX with good low power efficency are apparently almost impossible to get nowadays - and it sucks that they're not tested for it most of the time either.

 

Edit:

 

Event the Corsair SF600 Titanium rated power supply power efficiency below 25W is sub par (as far as I can see):

 

https://www.cybenetics.com/d/cybenetics_4v1.pdf

 

The HDPlex gan is much better suited for sub 50W - see:

 

https://smallformfactor.net/forum/threads/hdplex-250w-gan.17801/page-2

 

 

 

Edited by jit-010101
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  • 3 months later...

OK, it obviously took me a few days to proceed with my build. It is time for an Update:

 

tl;dnr: Do not do it, it is not worth the effort, unless you want to substantially invest effort and time - You know the Levi's commercial with the boy hammering the square peg into the round hole? Right - Just like that, only steel instead of wood... Maybe it would be easier with a 3D-printed bracket with metal inserts (I would not trust time-yielding plastic to hold up the torque of the horizontally mounted PSU...). But even then, it is a mechanically tight fight (not yet regarding the airflow...). Multiple times, I though about selling the Corsair and buying an SFX PSU instead, but I had already invested too much time to not see the result.

 

No experiences with operation yet (temperatures, etc.).

 

This turned out a frankenstein-ed brick-like NAS with too many organs inside... 😂

 

Long story:

The existing top beam and the vertical PSU assembly bracket were made from a 1 mm metal sheet that I trusted absolutely zero to carry an ATX PSU horizontally. So I removed it and designed a really solid bracket from 20 mm square piping (1.5 mm strength) that I cut badly at home, filed the saw buildup down forever, and had it welded that should be sufficent:

PSU-brace.thumb.jpg.bb3300b71c2b6bb02dc40fc38003ebf9.jpg

There is little space in the case between the LED PCB on the front side and the motherboard, and the supporting feet of the bracket were unfortuntaly welded 5 mm too wide apart. So I had to cut the lower pipe bits into two C-Shaped feet, and file slots in there for the bottom screws (not yet in the photo). You need the open feet to get it under the bottom screw head, too.

After the fact, I would redesign the bracket because the access and screw holes ended up in pipe walls, a horizontal one (top right), and a vertical one (low left) - which cost me ~ one hours of milling with a hand machine drill, and two broken drill bits and one broken wood milling bit to clear for the screw head (You can tell from how they look and where they found their final position, too). All not really professional work, but I finally made it work and painted it black with metal protection finish.

 

The countersunk screws holding the original beam were fine-pitch threaded, but my threading tools were metric standard, so I had to order new screws (in the foto, there is temporary screws that will not allow the cover to go over). I also had to cut a piece out, for the cable to go to the PSU (I put some felt pad protector in there to protect the cable - We would not want the case to be "powered"). I designed the bracket to leave most of the ventilation opening uncovered (just really few mm at the side, top and bottom are covered, I do not think it's a big deal). I also took out all the mesh from the front and cover sides ot allow better airflow. I could remove the small hole sheet from the front, too, if it was a problem, but the remaining openings would be really large. I managed to fixate it on the bottom with only one bottom screw (No way to turn it), but the bracket is basically supported on the feet itseld, so the screw only kind of fixes its position.

1275275899_JonsboN3modrightside.thumb.jpg.e15f288fb1ee161ee92c9b15e7fce0e8.jpg

If I ever wanted to mount süß outside the drive bay in "first floor", it would have to be on the other side (before the mod, you could mount one on each side).

The PSU hovers like 2 cm above the mainboard - luckily only on ca. the back 1/3 of it. Half of the CPU fan is underneath it. It is - intentionally - the PSU side with the sucking fan, though, so I hope it will not cause overheating, but practice will have to tell. If it goes wrong, there is two fan mounts on the back that could be equipped (probably in a pushing configuration).

 

1108306714_JonsboN3modheadroom.thumb.jpg.b06515ef9b97d4137ba4f5166a582c71.jpg

 

Also below it, are the power connector (so its cables are bent with a bit of tension), the SATA connectors (OK-ish, they are thinner / less stiff). In the photo above, the CPU plug is still missing, I had to find out that I need to seperate the 8 pin plug for that into two 4 pin ones.

514966074_JonsboN3modleftside.thumb.jpg.da76d78dcfd63dd95fc7bfc60c4eef9e.jpg

 

In the "ground floor", I plugged in two Seagate Exos X18 (18 TB). I do not really "need" parity, but the space of one is more than I need, so I am not sure yet how I will configure them (one productive, one daily backup / time machine, maybe). Once I retire my Synology, there will be one WD Red (8 TB) and a WD green backup drive (4 TB) to follow, but those are like 5 or 6 years old already.

 

After plugging in the CPU power, Unraid booted fine. The HDDs had ca. 30...32 °C, the M2 40°C, but I had them not actually in use.

But the two HDD fans plugged into the Hotplug plane are actually running at 100 % all the time, and sound like quite a hairdrier - They will have to go, I cannot imaging having those running permanently in a house without basement, even in a side room. I might switch them out for two Noctua 92x25 PWMs, but because it is two of them, it would be 40 bucks. I will do it if they are that much better than the 5 bucks ones (e.g. Xilence) - Maybe someone here has some experiences to compare.

 

I have seen a mod where someone plugged them into the MoBo fan socket, with a Y-cable following a small inline logic chip for speed control. Not sure if the MoBo can control them when they are not in the same compartment as the MoBo itself (The MoBo seems to measure the HDDs' temperature though). Again - If someone has some advice, I'd be happy.

 

So: It is doable. But really consider if it is worth it.

Edited by madmin
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