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It's Netflix for your NAS but Free!


demonmaestro

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Soo I am running some beta tests now and so far so good.

 

Here is what I have. I have designed a site that can be ran on a VM and will pull your videos from your NAS.

There is no costs for any of the software and "site" package I am designing.

I am also going to test if the site can be ran off of a Raspberry Pi.

 

Currently I am running a VM with 1 cpu core and 1gb of ram and was able to "stream" a blue-ray quality movie (Avatar) to my smart TV.

Being that the whole system worked with web programming it should work with any device that has an updated version of a web browser as the system is utilizing HTML5.

Best trick I am doing also is adding a download button where you can download your videos to your phone/tables and be able to watch your movies out of your home network. (Keep in mind that you have space on your device).

 

Once I have a full beta ready I will post instructions on how to get started and using the system.

 

Any ideas/comments please let me know. I welcome any input! 8)

 

(Sorry for any typos as I typed this on my phone)

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It maybe can but I am unfamiliar with dockers and how they work/created.  But I will include instructions on how to install everything. But if it is possible to create a docker or a plug in I am all ears on learning as far as that part.

 

As it currently is I am running a VM with Ubuntu server lite with LAMP. (Not currently utilizing MySQL).

 

Current loads while pulling 3 streams is at 0.5% cpu. :o

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No not yet. It's still in its rough state.  :o

Right now I have been testing out how the system handles "big" movies and still trying to figure out on if I should go with a BD route or a directory puller.

 

I am thinking of doing a directory puller. So your files will be like this.

 

A main directory that will be hard set aka //tower/movies. (User hard set)

Then a directory that will be the category.

Then a directory that has the Movies or episodes

 

And I am thinking of utilizing an upload so you can upload a "movie poster". That will put the file in with the movies/episodes.

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The biggest feature of Plex (to me personally) is the ability to transcode media content. What happens if I have a 20gb media file that I want to sync to my phone which is only 16gb?  Plex let's me transcode the source down to a smaller format / file size and sync to me phone.  I also like that if I'm streaming from outside my LAN, I can select a lower bitrate that's more in line with the bandwidth of my ISP.  I doubt many of us would be able to stream a full HD movie using consumer broadband (unless you have something like Google fiber).

 

I guess my main question is what is the difference between this and Plex?  Is it just the fact that they charge a monthly subscription to stream outside your LAN?

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Well the charging part for me was a big turn off part.

This system that I am designing will not let you stream outside of your network. However your talking about files sizes. Taking a Blue-ray version of Avatar was around 32GB in its MKV files format. Once converted down to MP4 the file size shrank down to 11GB. Now for regular DVDs they are ranging roughly 5GB file size in MKV and down to about 1GB in MP4.

 

Also PLEX does support quite a few devices but being able to have a "web based" environment to be able to watch your movies without the need for a "powerful machine" is a big plus in my book.

 

Essentially I am making this where you can run it on a Raspberry Pi with hardly any load. (1Ghz CPU with 512mb ram). Just something light weight.

 

I ain't saying PLEX has its place but I was just wanting to put another option out on the table for people to use for free.  ;)

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Well the charging part for me was a big turn off part.

This system that I am designing will not let you stream outside of your network. However your talking about files sizes. Taking a Blue-ray version of Avatar was around 32GB in its MKV files format. Once converted down to MP4 the file size shrank down to 11GB. Now for regular DVDs they are ranging roughly 5GB file size in MKV and down to about 1GB in MP4.

 

Also PLEX does support quite a few devices but being able to have a "web based" environment to be able to watch your movies without the need for a "powerful machine" is a big plus in my book.

 

Essentially I am making this where you can run it on a Raspberry Pi with hardly any load. (1Ghz CPU with 512mb ram). Just something light weight.

 

I ain't saying PLEX has its place but I was just wanting to put another option out on the table for people to use for free.  ;)

Just to clarify then, are you transcoding as well to downconvert these larger files to mp4s in your setup?  Don't get me wrong, I definitely like what your doing, but Plex is free to use inside the home already and doesn't need a powerful endpoint or even server if you are not transcoding. Just trying to figure out the gaps you are filling compared to them.

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...

I guess my main question is what is the difference between this and Plex?  Is it just the fact that they charge a monthly subscription to stream outside your LAN?

 

I could be wrong, but i don't think plexpass is required to stream outside your LAN anymore.

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...

I guess my main question is what is the difference between this and Plex?  Is it just the fact that they charge a monthly subscription to stream outside your LAN?

 

I could be wrong, but i don't think plexpass is required to stream outside your LAN anymore.

 

You are right. It depends on the client.

 

For example, Plex for Android is limited to 1 min of video playback unless you are a Plex Pass member. Alternatively, you could just use the browser and stream via Plex.tv to your android device. Web streaming worked on my previous phone (BB Z10) and on my current phone (GS6) just fine.

 

The user experience is MUCH better using a device specific app rather than web, in my opinion.

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Always good to have more alternatives.. I use video quite heavily and am very happy with plex and plexpass, for less frequent and in-home users only this might be nice...

 

If you have an apple device you could also try the airvideo docker in combination with airvideo on the ios device.

 

Or even just have a DLNA server running.. That also does what you are trying to build in my opinion ?

 

Something like minidlna ?

 

http://www.htpcbeginner.com/install-and-setup-minidlna-on-ubuntu-1204/

 

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...

I guess my main question is what is the difference between this and Plex?  Is it just the fact that they charge a monthly subscription to stream outside your LAN?

 

I could be wrong, but i don't think plexpass is required to stream outside your LAN anymore.

 

You are right. It depends on the client.

 

For example, Plex for Android is limited to 1 min of video playback unless you are a Plex Pass member. Alternatively, you could just use the browser and stream via Plex.tv to your android device. Web streaming worked on my previous phone (BB Z10) and on my current phone (GS6) just fine.

 

The user experience is MUCH better using a device specific app rather than web, in my opinion.

Had to check to be sure, but I'm not experiencing that limitation on Android client. Paid for the app before it went free, and was only pass member for a month.  I run the non-pass version of server using plugin and i do have it logged in to plex and remote connection enabled and working. Using same plex login on app and works fine.  I know sync and home features require pass, but i don't use those.  Strange.

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...

I guess my main question is what is the difference between this and Plex?  Is it just the fact that they charge a monthly subscription to stream outside your LAN?

 

I could be wrong, but i don't think plexpass is required to stream outside your LAN anymore.

 

You are right. It depends on the client.

 

For example, Plex for Android is limited to 1 min of video playback unless you are a Plex Pass member. Alternatively, you could just use the browser and stream via Plex.tv to your android device. Web streaming worked on my previous phone (BB Z10) and on my current phone (GS6) just fine.

 

The user experience is MUCH better using a device specific app rather than web, in my opinion.

Had to check to be sure, but I'm not experiencing that limitation on Android client. Paid for the app before it went free, and was only pass member for a month.  I run the non-pass version of server using plugin and i do have it logged in to plex and remote connection enabled and working. Using same plex login on app and works fine.  I know sync and home features require pass, but i don't use those.  Strange.

 

It works(ed) because you paid for the android client.

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Well the charging part for me was a big turn off part.

This system that I am designing will not let you stream outside of your network. However your talking about files sizes. Taking a Blue-ray version of Avatar was around 32GB in its MKV files format. Once converted down to MP4 the file size shrank down to 11GB. Now for regular DVDs they are ranging roughly 5GB file size in MKV and down to about 1GB in MP4.

 

Also PLEX does support quite a few devices but being able to have a "web based" environment to be able to watch your movies without the need for a "powerful machine" is a big plus in my book.

 

Essentially I am making this where you can run it on a Raspberry Pi with hardly any load. (1Ghz CPU with 512mb ram). Just something light weight.

 

I ain't saying PLEX has its place but I was just wanting to put another option out on the table for people to use for free.  ;)

Just to clarify then, are you transcoding as well to downconvert these larger files to mp4s in your setup?  Don't get me wrong, I definitely like what your doing, but Plex is free to use inside the home already and doesn't need a powerful endpoint or even server if you are not transcoding. Just trying to figure out the gaps you are filling compared to them.

 

No I am down converting them using handbrake.

 

I haven't fully looked into all the features of Plex but I am just putting another option out on the table for people to use.

 

I do have to say this is also a sub part of another project I am working on. So in reality I am just killing 2 birds with one stone. <-Figure of speech.

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Good luck to you I say,

 

From tiny acorns do mighty oaks grow

 

I think we should always encourage development...  :)

 

Agreed, and I'm going to say best of luck.

 

But I'm also going to say... check out Emby, it's opensource so you can jump in and help, or get ideas from them. Emby also  allows far more customization then Plex... but it also doesn't have the "it just works" factor that Plex has.

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So i'm a web developer for my full time job. The HTML5 player can have issues for formats and certain encodings.

You can encode MP4's that won't play in the native HTML5 player (part of my job is to fix these)

 

This is why in programs such as EMBY, some files can be streamed directly and others must be transcoded whilst playing. Just something to keep in mind as some users may have files not directly supported :)

 

Keep up the good work. If you do need any help, drop me a message. If i can, i will

 

Regards,

Jamie

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  • 2 weeks later...

 

 

It works(ed) because you paid for the android client.

 

The android client is a one time charge, not a monthly subscription. 

In order to fully sync a movie to your android - that requires the plexpass / subscription, but to stream that costs nothing but the purchase of the app. It's well worth a couple dollars..

 

Not arguing the point - just clarifying that you can stream in and out of your network without the subscription fee.

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You're building a different media server then? I wish you the best. There is some tough competition out there already.

 

What you have described so far sounds just like Emby Server, even the sync part. You can access your server over the internet if you so want to. Emby also has payback applications built for various devices so you're not stuck running in a browser. It also scrapes the metadata with very little manual intervention needed. Plus much more.

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