Hoopster

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Hoopster last won the day on June 7 2022

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Community Answers

  1. I will let @trurl continue once you post diagnostics, but, for share contents to be accessible on a PC in the LAN, the shares need to be exported with the appropriate sucirty setting. Public is probably easiest until you get thing sorted out. You don't have to map network drives to access shares, but, it is one way of getting to exported shares.
  2. From the PC are you trying to 1) just access the Unraid GUI? 2) access the shares and contents of the Unraid array? 3) both?
  3. /tmp is often the generic way of specifying transcoding to RAM. I don't know how you have it setup. In my system, I transcode to /tmp/PlexRamScratch which has a size limit of 16GB. While a movie is hw transcoding I see this activity in the designated transcode location of /tmp/PlexRamScratch/Transcode/Sessions Additional plex-transcode files are created as needed. If no other transcode location (RAM, SSD, etc.) is specified, or is improperly configured, in the Plex docker container configuration, Plex defaults to cache\appdata\plex\Library\Application Support\Plex Media Server\Cache\Transcode\Sessions for transcoding which could cause appdata location utilization to get very high. When the transcode ends, the files are deleted and utilization goes back down.
  4. When transcoding is taking place., check in whatever location you have transcoding set to (/tmp or wherever the RAM location is). When transcoding is taking place, there will be a Transcode/Sessions folder and the transcoded files are created real time in the sessions folder.
  5. That certainly has the grunt to do what you need but, as seen here, even a modern i3 (such as the 12300) may be enough. iGPU/QSV in the modern core processors is much better than it was in the i5-3570K. It is sufficient for Plex even if you have transcoding needs and cannot direct play all content. The 12700K will give you even more headroom, of course, and enough even to run a VM.
  6. I get the feeling you could post this every month for a long, long time and it would still be true. Notice how it never shows up as an option for voting in wish lists or feature request polls? It's an often-debated topic in these forums but no one from Limetech has ever hinted that it is even under consideration.
  7. Just as an FYI - here is a description of all the cache settings that can be applied to each Unraid user share:
  8. Read speeds in Unraid are limited by the speed of the single disk on which the file is stored. It is also possible to configure shares as "cache-only" shares. This means the data lives on a cache drive only and is never written to the parity-protected array. As an example some Unraid users put a copy of some Plex data (most commonly viewed movies or TV Shows, etc.) In a cache-only location. However, management of this is manual. There is no mechanism in Unraid to decide what is most-commonly accessed and to move it automatically to a cache-only share.
  9. A cache drive does not function like a cache buffer on a hard drive. Unraid cache is not a location in which frequently accessed files are stored for faster access. The cache drive in Unraid has as one its functions the ability to cache writes to the parity-protected array. Writes to the parity protected array will be slower than to an SSD cache drive. On a share-by-share basis, you can tell Unraid to write the files first to a cache drive. Since the cache drive is not part of the parity-protected array, this initial write to cache does not pay the "parity write penalty." The Mover can then be configured to write the cached files to the HDD array at a low usage time such as 2am. While on the cache drive, files are treated like they are on the array in the designated share and there are no access issues. The "downside" to caching writes is that files on the cache drive are not parity protected until they are written to the array by the Mover. There is an alternative known as "turbo write" which writes files to the parity-protect array much faster than the default read/modify/write method but it does require all array disks to be spun up. There is a also a turbo write plugin which enables/disables turbo write as needed. If you are only getting 7-9 Gb/s on iperf, there are likely some configuration tweaks needed. You are going to be able to take advantage of 10G networking transfer speeds only when writing between fast SSDs on both ends of the transfer. Once you have a mechanical drive in the data transfer path, you will get sub 1G speeds.
  10. After a longer time at idle it did dip down to 24 watts. Perhaps something was going on that I did not detect initially after the disks spun down. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  11. On the Kill-A-Watt, the idle power draw bounces between 31-35 Watts. This is with all six disks spun down and no active docker containers or plugins. I also have no discrete GPU in this system and rely on the iGPU in Xeon E-2246 CPU. Bifurcation on the single x16 PCIe slot in the E3C246D2I Mini-ITX board is the same as the E3C246D4U. Here is a screenshot taken from my E3C246D2I:
  12. Which one? E3C246D2I Mini-ITX (8 SATA ports; 4 onboard, 4 with OCuLink cable) or E3C246D4U MicroATx (8 onboard SATA ports) Both have IPMI Of course, if you are talking about bifurcation, I assume you mean the E3C246D4U and no the Mini-ITX board with just one x16 PCIe slot. C246 WSI has no IPMI. I have a Kill-A-Watt I could attach to either system. Here are the bifurcation options for the PCIE6/PCIE4 slots:
  13. Check into Jellyfin Emby also requires a paid version for hardware transcoding.
  14. Edit Plex docker container, then add another variable:
  15. WireGuard is a VPN protocol. Many of the docker containers that use VPNs can work with a VPN service/provider which may or may not use WireGuard as the VPN protocol. In the example I gave above of DelugeVPN, I use it with the Private Internet Access VPN service over the WireGaurd protocol. The WIreGuard protocol implemented in Unraid will allow you to setup secure remote connection and even route all remote traffic through the WireGuard VPN connection if desired. However, WireGuard is not full-fledged VPN service/provider. Here is a link to an article which mentions which VPN providers use WireGuard.